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Archive for April, 2005

threads

April 27, 2005 2 comments

On Alex McManus’ blog today he introduced the concept of threads. He says,

“A thread is a term used often in online classes and conversations. For example, within the conversation environment of this blog, many of you have started new conversations sparked by the conversation that is already taking place here. These conversations are a kind of thread that weaves in and out of our general conversations.

When a Christ following leader engages a community in a conversation or initiates a new relationship with say a nonbeliever, he begins a new thread. These conversations, of course, are guided by the environment created by the spirit of Jesus that heals the world and yet they are also spontaneous and free to develop in their own way.

Start a new thread today. Have coffee with someone who has not yet believed. Or…Engage a group of nonbelieving friends in a conversation around the scriptures. Or…Ask Christ followers what would need to happen for us to live our lives for someone other than ourselves today.

Christ following leaders starting new threads. That’s one of the main ways the story of Jesus intersects the story of us.”

In reading the comments to his post I came across this:

“Conrad Gempf wrote a fascinating little book called “Jesus Asked” in which he shows brilliantly that Jesus teaching style was to ask questions more than give answers, in other words, in our language, to start new threads. Gempf says “Jesus was a bit different from other religious teachers. Moses wanted to tell you the law of God. Prophets were always telling you what the Lord was saying. But apparently if you met Jesus, he was more likely to ask you something, than tell you something.”

That is interesting and fascinating indeed. As a teacher and pastor the easy thing to do is get up and preach answers to people. “The Bible says it, so do it!” But that is totally law giving and makes Christianity so rigid. Plus, where is room for the Spirit created to move and act and convict and touch the heart? Preachers need to guide people and direct them, but maybe that can be accomplished differently by asking really good questions and starting really good threads. Then, instead of demanding people say/do/think like us, we can start them on their own spiritual journey to find Jesus Christ and to become the type of follower that he wants them to be.

Categories: Uncategorized

threads

April 27, 2005 2 comments

On Alex McManus’ blog today he introduced the concept of threads. He says,

“A thread is a term used often in online classes and conversations. For example, within the conversation environment of this blog, many of you have started new conversations sparked by the conversation that is already taking place here. These conversations are a kind of thread that weaves in and out of our general conversations.

When a Christ following leader engages a community in a conversation or initiates a new relationship with say a nonbeliever, he begins a new thread. These conversations, of course, are guided by the environment created by the spirit of Jesus that heals the world and yet they are also spontaneous and free to develop in their own way.

Start a new thread today. Have coffee with someone who has not yet believed. Or…Engage a group of nonbelieving friends in a conversation around the scriptures. Or…Ask Christ followers what would need to happen for us to live our lives for someone other than ourselves today.

Christ following leaders starting new threads. That’s one of the main ways the story of Jesus intersects the story of us.”

In reading the comments to his post I came across this:

“Conrad Gempf wrote a fascinating little book called “Jesus Asked” in which he shows brilliantly that Jesus teaching style was to ask questions more than give answers, in other words, in our language, to start new threads. Gempf says “Jesus was a bit different from other religious teachers. Moses wanted to tell you the law of God. Prophets were always telling you what the Lord was saying. But apparently if you met Jesus, he was more likely to ask you something, than tell you something.”

That is interesting and fascinating indeed. As a teacher and pastor the easy thing to do is get up and preach answers to people. “The Bible says it, so do it!” But that is totally law giving and makes Christianity so rigid. Plus, where is room for the Spirit created to move and act and convict and touch the heart? Preachers need to guide people and direct them, but maybe that can be accomplished differently by asking really good questions and starting really good threads. Then, instead of demanding people say/do/think like us, we can start them on their own spiritual journey to find Jesus Christ and to become the type of follower that he wants them to be.

Categories: Uncategorized

threads

April 27, 2005 2 comments

On Alex McManus’ blog today he introduced the concept of threads. He says,

“A thread is a term used often in online classes and conversations. For example, within the conversation environment of this blog, many of you have started new conversations sparked by the conversation that is already taking place here. These conversations are a kind of thread that weaves in and out of our general conversations.

When a Christ following leader engages a community in a conversation or initiates a new relationship with say a nonbeliever, he begins a new thread. These conversations, of course, are guided by the environment created by the spirit of Jesus that heals the world and yet they are also spontaneous and free to develop in their own way.

Start a new thread today. Have coffee with someone who has not yet believed. Or…Engage a group of nonbelieving friends in a conversation around the scriptures. Or…Ask Christ followers what would need to happen for us to live our lives for someone other than ourselves today.

Christ following leaders starting new threads. That’s one of the main ways the story of Jesus intersects the story of us.”

In reading the comments to his post I came across this:

“Conrad Gempf wrote a fascinating little book called “Jesus Asked” in which he shows brilliantly that Jesus teaching style was to ask questions more than give answers, in other words, in our language, to start new threads. Gempf says “Jesus was a bit different from other religious teachers. Moses wanted to tell you the law of God. Prophets were always telling you what the Lord was saying. But apparently if you met Jesus, he was more likely to ask you something, than tell you something.”

That is interesting and fascinating indeed. As a teacher and pastor the easy thing to do is get up and preach answers to people. “The Bible says it, so do it!” But that is totally law giving and makes Christianity so rigid. Plus, where is room for the Spirit created to move and act and convict and touch the heart? Preachers need to guide people and direct them, but maybe that can be accomplished differently by asking really good questions and starting really good threads. Then, instead of demanding people say/do/think like us, we can start them on their own spiritual journey to find Jesus Christ and to become the type of follower that he wants them to be.

Categories: Uncategorized

the power of relational evangelism

A couple of weeks ago I posted some thoughts on a book by Bill Hybels called ‘Becoming a Contagious Christian.’ The main concept was that we need to develop relationships with people far from God before we just hit them up with the Gospel. People respond to relationship and community, trust-based relationship open up their hearts to hearing the message.

One of the challenges for me to relational evangelism is that I don’t have many relationships with non-Christian people. So, what do I do?

I recently read ‘More Ready Than You realize’ by Rick Richardson. This is another book about evangelism. In his book he challenges people like me to make conscious decisions that place us in the line of fire with non-Christians. This may mean joining a sports league, coaching a child’s activities, or attending town meetings. Another idea Richardson lists is to visit the same place regularly and get to know the people who work there.

I have been intentional about doing this at the Caribou in town and things are happening. It is hard, but I have even stepped out of my introverted box and gotten to know the names of a couple women who work there. Just today I had the chance to tell one of them about the Quarry. She is a ex-Lutheran, post-Catholic who is searching for something and can’t quite figure it out.

She doesn’t want stale, stiff, stifling religion. She needs the revolution of God’s love and I was able to invite her to come and check out our Jesus community. It was pretty cool and since I’m there so often I feel like the dialogue will continue. May God bless it.

Try this in your own life. Make strategic decisions about the places you eat, shop, and study. Build some trust-based relationships you can use to share Christ with others. Pray throughout your entire visit to these spots and just see if God doesn’t show up.

Categories: Uncategorized

the power of relational evangelism

A couple of weeks ago I posted some thoughts on a book by Bill Hybels called ‘Becoming a Contagious Christian.’ The main concept was that we need to develop relationships with people far from God before we just hit them up with the Gospel. People respond to relationship and community, trust-based relationship open up their hearts to hearing the message.

One of the challenges for me to relational evangelism is that I don’t have many relationships with non-Christian people. So, what do I do?

I recently read ‘More Ready Than You realize’ by Rick Richardson. This is another book about evangelism. In his book he challenges people like me to make conscious decisions that place us in the line of fire with non-Christians. This may mean joining a sports league, coaching a child’s activities, or attending town meetings. Another idea Richardson lists is to visit the same place regularly and get to know the people who work there.

I have been intentional about doing this at the Caribou in town and things are happening. It is hard, but I have even stepped out of my introverted box and gotten to know the names of a couple women who work there. Just today I had the chance to tell one of them about the Quarry. She is a ex-Lutheran, post-Catholic who is searching for something and can’t quite figure it out.

She doesn’t want stale, stiff, stifling religion. She needs the revolution of God’s love and I was able to invite her to come and check out our Jesus community. It was pretty cool and since I’m there so often I feel like the dialogue will continue. May God bless it.

Try this in your own life. Make strategic decisions about the places you eat, shop, and study. Build some trust-based relationships you can use to share Christ with others. Pray throughout your entire visit to these spots and just see if God doesn’t show up.

Categories: Uncategorized

the power of relational evangelism

A couple of weeks ago I posted some thoughts on a book by Bill Hybels called ‘Becoming a Contagious Christian.’ The main concept was that we need to develop relationships with people far from God before we just hit them up with the Gospel. People respond to relationship and community, trust-based relationship open up their hearts to hearing the message.

One of the challenges for me to relational evangelism is that I don’t have many relationships with non-Christian people. So, what do I do?

I recently read ‘More Ready Than You realize’ by Rick Richardson. This is another book about evangelism. In his book he challenges people like me to make conscious decisions that place us in the line of fire with non-Christians. This may mean joining a sports league, coaching a child’s activities, or attending town meetings. Another idea Richardson lists is to visit the same place regularly and get to know the people who work there.

I have been intentional about doing this at the Caribou in town and things are happening. It is hard, but I have even stepped out of my introverted box and gotten to know the names of a couple women who work there. Just today I had the chance to tell one of them about the Quarry. She is a ex-Lutheran, post-Catholic who is searching for something and can’t quite figure it out.

She doesn’t want stale, stiff, stifling religion. She needs the revolution of God’s love and I was able to invite her to come and check out our Jesus community. It was pretty cool and since I’m there so often I feel like the dialogue will continue. May God bless it.

Try this in your own life. Make strategic decisions about the places you eat, shop, and study. Build some trust-based relationships you can use to share Christ with others. Pray throughout your entire visit to these spots and just see if God doesn’t show up.

Categories: Uncategorized

the role of hospitality in evangelism

I recently read this on the blog of Alex McManus (brother of Erwin out at Mosiac church in Los Angeles, http://www.xanga.com/home.aspx?user=alexmcmanus) and I thought it was a great thing to think about regarding evangelism:

Hospitality is a key to evangelism in the 21st century.

Let’s distinguish hospitality from entertaining. Entertaining guests means that we put on a demonstration of our best to give a good impression. Entertaining is like our fine china. Nothing wrong with that. Hospitality, on the other hand, means inviting people into our lives. Hospitality is our paper plates.

Inviting others into our lives and homes is natural when we move from being strangers to becoming friends of God. “If you consider me a believer in the Lord,” said Lydia, “come and stay at my house.” (Acts 16.15)

It is all part of the revolution of the Kingdom of God and making the decision to live our lives, to give every part of our lives, for the sake of others. Like every revolution, its success will depend on the willing sacrifice of its people.

What is the revolution?…I continue to say more but check out the sermon series at crossroadscommunity.net- Brian Tome is saying some amazing things there about the Christian life and the local church)

Categories: Uncategorized